Maia Stefana Oprea


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Painting “Meira I”

Meira I, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 150 cm, 2015

MEIRA I, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 150 cm, 2015

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YOUTH – by J.M Coetzee

     I’ve just finished reading the second part of J.M Coetzee’s autobiography, his follow-up to Boyhood, namely Youth“.

"Youth" watercolor on paper, 2013

“Youth” watercolor on paper, 2013

 Beginning with the second half of Youth, the novel felt mostly black and white. What struck me was a detail, really, but it had a major impact on my further reading. Continue reading


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“BOILING” painting series

<<With a stunning character of the touch, the “Boiling” series throws the eye into full autopsy. In the depth, the colour freezes; on the surface, it burns. The dominant sensation: that you are retracing the abstract movement of a blade, that you are looking straight in the innards of colours – hot, swollen, nocturnal. No, we are not talking about an expressionist projection, but of a carnivorous fascination towards the form.>> (L.G.S)

The “Boiling” series is composed of four individual canvases, standing for themselves, which are based on the same inner form. Most important for me has been to reach the climax of the fight given to create, at the same time: a possible modular structure that could be perpetuated indefinitely and a sequence in which these so-called modules remain completely embedded in the whole that contains them, without their independence being affected.

'Boiling' series, mixed technique on canvas, 4 x (60 x 80 cm), 2011; photo credits: Ema Cojocaru

The ‘Boiling’ paintings are created in a personal technique, which combines oil colours with other materials, such as rope, wire, light wood, clothes and other diverse textiles. The following photographs should give an idea of the 3-dimensionality of the paintings’ surface.

photo credits: Ema Cojocaru

'Boiling' series in perspective, showing the textile relief; photo credits: Ema Cojocaru

The current set is the result of a fiery war –which I attended as an active spectator – and the countless transformations occurring during work. What I had initially proposed myself was almost meant not to reach a purpose, and not infrequently I was afraid that if I add anything else, the canvas will be destroyed.